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"Interpreting Climate Change" Workshop in Spokane, WA, Nov. 2017 - Content Available On-line

Here's your save-the-date announcement for a two-day Earth to Sky workshop on interpreting climate change, which will be held as part of the National Association for Interpretation’s Annual Conference in Spokane, WA this November. This workshop will include key elements common to all of our courses - science content from NASA science specialists, and interpretation techniques from experienced interpreters and ETS alumni, joined together in a collegial environment. 

 
There is a maximum of 25 seats for this workshop, first come, first served, and open to all regardless of your affiliation or workplace. NAI will be opening registration soon. A fee will be charged by NAI (most likely around $200). Here’s the basic info:
 
Interpreting Climate Change

2-Day Earth to Sky Workshop at the NAI National Conference
Spokane, Washington
 
Interpreting climate change can be challenging!
It’s complicated, and audiences may respond on a wide variety of emotional and
intellectual levels. This two-day, highly interactive workshop will join interpreters
and NASA science and education specialists to learn from each other about climate science 
and communication. We’ll cover some basics of the science, and explore appropriate techniques for
addressing this subject with a variety of audiences, including youth. Abundant
interpretation, education and scientific resources will be provided to support
participants’ climate change interpretation efforts. 
 
The first day of the workshop will be held at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, and the second will be at the conference hotel.  (Transportation from the conference hotel to the refuge will be provided, as well as lunch on both days.)
 
When:    Our workshop is November 13th – 14th 2017
Where:  NAI Conference runs November 14th – 18th 2017,   Spokane, Washington
 
Registration and Lodging: Reserve through NAI   http://www.interpnet.com/conference 
Registration will open soon; the cutoff will be October 10th.
It is recommended that participants reserve lodging ASAP.
 
Target Audience: Employees from the USFS, USFWS, and other Federal, State and Municipal agencies, as well as non-profit and private organizations with science communicators,interpreters, environmental educators and educationspecialists.
Participants should have some experiencewith interpretation/science communication. Knowledge of climatescience is not required.
 
For more Info (and to add yourname to the mailing list for updates) contact: Anita Davis This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

 

save the date

Save the date for this event being broadcast from the Newseum in D.C. 1:00- 3:30 PM ET

Join NASA, NPS and other agencies, plus science organizations for this live two-hour broadcast – see it on NASA TV and www.nasa.gov. (Check your local cable stations for the NASA Channel or watch it on line). This press conference will be chock full of information about the eclipse, and will serve as a kick-off for increased publicitiy about this wonderful celestial event.

Learn about:

How to experience the August 21 eclipse through the eyes of NASA

Views from different areas of the country and how to prepare

Safe eclipse viewing practices

What causes an eclipse and why you should care

How to participate in events across the country

The unique research opportunities to study our Earth, moon and the sun

 

Click on the poster to download and use it.

 

 

Class photo smlEarth to Sky - Canada,  Climate Change Science and Communication Course in Yellowknife, NWT recently completed

April 19-21, 2017

This course focused on climate science and communication as it applies to NW Canada. The heart of the course consisted of three days of face-to-face sessions held at the Explorer Hotel in Yellowknife.

Scientists from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, several Universities, and the Gov't of the Northwest Territories presented sessions on topics ranging from carbon fluxes in permafrost, and hydrologic changes to NWT rivers, to the effects of climate change on migratory birds. The course included a field trip and tour of the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Center, where participants experienced a wide range of habitats representing the Arctic, and learned about how the changing climate is contributing to the loss of heritage resources.  Representatives from local utilities and planning organizations provided information on climate mitigation efforts.

The course preparatory assignments, video-taped presentations and all course materials are now available on the course home page. Additional regional courses are being planned for a variety of locations in coming months and years.